Wild Game

Learn how to make the best deer snack sticks, deer sausage or any other wild game products.

7 Topics 49 Posts
  • Venison Snack Stick Recipe - Wild Game

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    Good afternoon, this will be my first time making jalapeño cheddar snack stick, I plan on a 25lb batch, I have the Excalibur seasoning. Can I use nonfat dry milk as a binder as I do in summer sausage? And how much would you recommend? Thanks

  • Venison Summer Sausage Recipe - Wild Game

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    Thanks a lot Dave, greatly appreciated!

  • Wild Game: How to make Turkey Jerky

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    Wild Game Banner Wild Game: How to make Turkey Jerky Ingredients

    Walton’s Bold
    Brown Sugar
    Water
    Sliced Turkey

    What to Do?

    Step 1: Slicing the Meat
    To begin, grab a meat slicer and slice your turkey breast into thin and uniform pieces. Thinner slices ensure faster and more consistent drying, resulting in a better texture for your jerky.

    Step 2: Marinade and Vacuum Tumble
    Next, prepare a marinade of your choice using ingredients like soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, honey, garlic powder, onion powder, and black pepper. This flavorful blend will enhance the taste and tenderness of your turkey jerky. Place the turkey slices into a vacuum tumbler and pour in the marinade, ensuring each slice is thoroughly coated. The vacuum tumbling process helps the marinade penetrate the meat, infusing it with delicious flavors.

    Step 3: Smoking the Turkey Jerky
    Now it’s time to fire up your smoker. Set up smoke screens on a smoker rack and preheat the smoker to the desired temperature. Lay out the marinated turkey slices on the screens, making sure they don’t touch each other. This allows for even airflow and smoke penetration, ensuring a consistent flavor throughout. Follow the specific smoke schedule provided in our video or recipe. Keep the smoker going until the turkey jerky reaches your preferred level of dryness and tenderness.

    Once your turkey jerky is fully smoked and dried, remove it from the smoker and allow it to cool down. Take a moment to savor the mouthwatering aroma that fills the air. Now, it’s time to indulge in this irresistible homemade snack! The turkey jerky can be stored in an airtight container or resealable bags to maintain its freshness. But be warned, with its amazing taste, it’s unlikely to last long.

    Smoke Schedule

    90-minute drying, no smoke or humidity
    130 for an hour
    145 for an hour
    175° until the internal temperature is 165°

    Wrap Up

    Congratulations! You have successfully created your own batch of smoky, tender, and flavorful turkey jerky. By following these simple steps, you can enjoy a protein-rich snack that is perfect for any occasion. So grab a slice, and treat yourself to the delicious balance of flavors in your homemade turkey jerky. Happy snacking!

    Shop waltonsinc.com for 10 Inch Meat Slicer Shop waltonsinc.com for Jerky Seasoning Watch Waltons: Wild Game: How to make Turkey Jerky



  • 7 Votes
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    Jonathon Turkey Works. I don’t know about that Vegetable stuff, but good ol brown sugar is lovely!

  • 2 Votes
    2 Posts
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    As Kurt said, a little different technique, but the end result is pretty much the same.

    Nicely done.

  • Goose Sausage Recipe - Wild Game

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    Wild Game Banner Goose Sausage Recipe Frozen Goose Cutting Goose Adding Fat to Grind Grinding Stuffing Goose Meat Block

    10 lb Goose
    2.5 lb Pork Fat (or 10 lb untrimmed pork butts)

    Ingredients:
    1 bag Cajun Sausage Seasoning - 11 oz for 12.5 lb batch
    Sure Cure - 1/2 oz for 12.5 lb batch
    3/4 quart of water

    Optional Ingredients:
    Sure Gel Meat Binder - 3 oz per 12.5 lb
    High-Temp Cheese - 1 lb
    Either Encapsulated Citric Acid - 2 oz per 12.5 lb
    OR
    Sodium Erythorbate - 3 GRAMS for 12.5 lb batch

    Equipment

    Meat Grinder
    Meat Mixer
    Sausage Stuffer
    Walton’s Sausage Linker (Optional)

    Casing Preparation

    We will be using 30mm Clear Collagen Casings, and they don’t require any preparation, simply remove them from the package and load them onto a stuffing tube. We chose the clear because we are going to hang these in our smokehouse; you can use smoked collagen if you want the mahogany appearance or even fresh collagen if you are going to coil the sausage on a rack in your smoker. If you try to hang fresh collagen in a smokehouse, you are going to open your smoker and see all your product on the floor. It might not happen the first time you try it or the second, but it will eventually happen, so don’t hang fresh collagen.

    Process Clean your goose and soak it for 24 hours in salt water in a cooler. This will bleed the meat and give you a better taste and consistency. Pack your goose meat into an 8-inch wide vac bag roll (or use multiple 8" diameter bags if you don’t have a roll) and freeze it almost solid. Cut the goose meat into chunks small enough to fit down the throat of your grinder. Grind the goose meat through a 3/8" plate. Grind the goose and pork fat through a 1/8" plate (Yes, yes, I know I said 1/16th" plate again, no such plate exists outside the crazy place that is my mind). Try to mix the pork fat sporadically throughout the second grind to help disperse it evenly. Pork Fat

    With goose being as dark as it is and having a lighter consistency, we really think it helped to go with straight pork fat instead of a 50/50 mix of Goose to untrimmed Pork Butts. You want to go for either 20% or 25% fat content with these.

    Pork Butts

    If you cannot find any pork fat, you can use a 50/50 mix of goose and untrimmed pork butts.

    Meat Mixing

    Mix seasoning, cure, sure gel, and a cure accelerator (unless it is encapsulated citric acid) with the meat. You want to mix this until you have very good protein extraction; you will know you have reached this when your meat starts getting very sticky and tacky, and it pulls when you try to stretch it instead of breaking into smaller clumps. With a meat mixer, you usually want to mix for around 8 minutes, being careful to change the directions of the paddles every minute or so. If you used encapsulated citric acid, you should add it, along with the cheese, during the last 60 seconds of mixing. This will prevent the encapsulation from splitting or the cheese from smearing.

    Sausage Stuffing

    Choose the largest tube that your casing will fit over. We did both the 30mm clear collagen. With the collagen casings, you want to stuff until you can faintly see a swirling line down the casing. Then cut them to the longest length that you can hang in your smoker.

    Note

    The Walton’s Sausage Linker can be a big-time saver here. With just a little practice, you can tie off your casings in a fraction of the time it takes to hand-tie them.

    Thermal Processing & Smoking:

    120° for 30 Minutes (With No Smoke Or Humidity and Vents Wide Open)
    140° For 60 Minutes (Add Smoke & Humidity and close vents 3/4)
    160° For 60 Minutes (Continue Smoke & Humidity)
    185° Until Internal Temperature is 165°. Remove smoke & continue adding humidity, also close vents

    Cooling

    Run a 5-minute shower cycle with fans on
    OR
    Place in an ice bath for 10 minutes to stop the cooking process & help set the casing for the collagen (this also helps separate it from the cellulose).

    Wrap up

    With Goose, I think using pork fat made a big difference vs. a 50/50 mix with untrimmed pork butts; this allowed the goose color, flavor, and consistency to stand out. The cellulose casings worked wonderfully here; the skinless product’s appearance and consistency were a big hit!

    Other Notes A 24-hour soak in salt water will help bleed the meat Remember to freeze your meat almost solid Without a cure accelerator of some kind, you need to hold this for 12 hours after stuffing before going to the smoker. Why Goose Sausage?

    Goose Sausage is simply sausage that is made from a combination of Goose meat and pork fat. If you cannot get just pork fat, you can use a 50/50 mix of goose to untrimmed pork butts, but you will be happier with the finished product if you use 80% goose and 20% pork fat.

    Watch WaltonsTV: Wild Game: Cajun Goose Sausage Shop waltonsinc.com for Sausage Seasonings Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Grinders Shop waltonsinc.com for High-Temp Cheese Shop waltonsinc.com for Boning Knives
  • Goose Pepperoni Sticks - Wild Game

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    2 Votes
    1 Posts
    1k Views
    Wild Game Banner Goose Pepperoni Sticks Frozen Goose Second Grind With Fat Manual Linker Butchers Link Finished Goose Pepperoni Meat Block

    10 lb Goose
    2.5 lb Pork Fat (or 10 lb untrimmed pork butts)

    Ingredients:
    1 bag Pepperoni Unit - 11.2 oz for 12.5 lb batch
    Sure Cure - 1/2 oz for 12.5 lb batch
    3/4 Gallon of water

    Optional Ingredients:
    Sure Gel Meat Binder - 3 oz per 12.5 lb
    High-Temp Cheese - 1 lb
    Either Encapsulated Citric Acid - 2 oz per 12.5 lb
    OR
    Sodium Erythorbate - 3 GRAMS for 12.5 lb batch

    Equipment

    Meat Grinder
    Meat Mixer
    Sausage Stuffer
    Walton’s Sausage Linker (Optional)

    Casing Preparation

    We will be making some in 19mm Smoked Collagen Casings and some in 26mm Cellulose Casings. Neither of these casings requires any preparation, but the cellulose casing is NOT edible, so you must peel it before eating.

    Process Clean your goose and soak it for 24 hours in salt water in a cooler. This will bleed the meat and give you a better taste and consistency. Pack your goose meat into an 8-inch wide vac bag roll (or use multiple 8" diameter bags and freeze it almost solid. Cut the goose meat into chunks small enough to fit down the throat of your grinder. Grind the goose meat through a 3/8" plate. Grind the goose and pork fat through a 1/8" plate. Try to mix the pork fat sporadically throughout the second grind to help disperse it evenly. Pork Fat -

    With goose being as dark as it is and having a lighter consistency, we really think it helped to go with straight pork fat instead of a 50/50 mix of Goose to untrimmed Pork Butts. You want to go for either 20% or 25% fat content with these.

    Pork Butts -

    If you cannot find any pork fat, you can use a 50/50 mix of goose and untrimmed pork butts.

    Meat Mixing

    Mix seasoning, cure, sure gel, and a cure accelerator(unless it is encapsulated citric acid) with the meat. You want to mix this until you have very good protein extraction; you will know you have reached this when your meat starts getting very sticky and tacky, and it pulls when you try to stretch it instead of breaking into smaller clumps. With a meat mixer, you usually want to mix for around 8 minutes, being careful to change the directions of the paddles every minute or so. If you used encapsulated citric acid, you should add it, along with the cheese, during the last 60 seconds of mixing. This will prevent the encapsulation from splitting or the cheese from smearing.

    Sausage Stuffing

    Choose the largest tube that your casing will fit over. We did both the 19mm smoke collagen and the 26mm cellulose casing, so we did have to switch tubes. With the collagen casings, you want to stuff until you can faintly see a swirling line down the casing. Then cut them to the longest length that you can hang in your smoker.

    For the cellulose casings, just stuff until they are full and smooth. These are very strong casings, and you shouldn’t have to worry about blowouts too much. Once they have been stuffed, you can twist them into links, but then you have to tie them off between every link. Or, you can go with a butcher twist that will give you bundles of 3 sausages.

    Note

    The Walton’s Sausage Linker can be a big-time saver here. With just a little practice, you can tie off your casings in a fraction of the time it takes to hand-tie them.

    Thermal Processing & Smoking:

    120° for 30 Minutes (With No Smoke Or Humidity and Vents Wide Open)
    130° For 60 Minutes (Add Smoke & Humidity and close vents 3/4)
    140° For 30 Minutes (Continue Smoke & Humidity)
    160° For 60 Minutes, Continue Smoke & Humidity
    180° Until Internal Temperature is 165°. Add Smoke & Humidity and Close Vents

    Cooling

    Run a 10-minute shower cycle with fans on
    OR
    Place in an ice bath for 10 minutes to stop the cooking process & help set the casing for the collagen (this also helps separate it from the cellulose).

    Wrap up

    With Goose, I think using pork fat made a big difference vs. a 50/50 mix with untrimmed pork butts; this allowed the goose color, flavor, and consistency to stand out. The cellulose casings worked wonderfully here; the skinless product’s appearance and consistency were a big hit.

    Other Notes A 24-hour soak in salt water will help bleed the meat Remember to freeze your meat almost solid Without a cure accelerator of some kind, you need to hold this for 12 hours after stuffing before going to the smoker. What is Pepperoni?

    Pepperoni is a cured style of Salami that is traditionally made from Pork and Beef, but it can be made from 100% of either one or other meats like Turkey or Wild Game. If you are going to slow cure it, then using 100% pork is recommended. In America, you can basically break down Pepperoni into Pizza Pepperoni and Sandwich Pepperoni, the Pizza Pepperoni is usually smaller in diameter, and Sandwich Pepperoni is larger in diameter. Both can either be smoked in a similar fashion as a Summer Sausage or cold cured.

    Watch WaltonsTV: Wild Game - Goose Pepperoni Sticks Shop waltonsinc.com for Pepperoni Seasoning Shop waltonsinc.com for Meat Grinders Shop waltonsinc.com for High-Temp Cheese Shop waltonsinc.com for Boning Knives