• Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    I do a wet brine in a 5 gallon bucket for pork bellies with a 2 gallon brine mix.

    My brine mix is:
    3/4 cup Kosher salt
    1 cup dark brown sugar
    1 cup white sugar
    1 rounded tablespoon #1 pink cure
    1 gallon water
    All is dissolved thoroughly before submerging the bellies into the brine.

    I wet brine refrigerated for usually 2 weeks but not less that 10 days.

    My question is Jonathon or others that may chime in with knowledge
    How should I add the “Bacon Taste Booster” to my wet brine to add a bacon flavor? Is there another that I should be trying?

    I’m not dry brining now nor am I injecting.

    I’ve been doing this my way for sometime now. A young man that likes to sit in front of the camera suggested that I may be able to benefit with this or other additives “With The Way I Do It”.

    Then there is the smoke schedule that comes into play later.

    Anyone?

  • Regular Contributors Power User

    I have never used it before, but just looking at the ingredients list makes me think you would need to cut back on the sugar and salt that you are currently using. How much though is the question since you really don’t know the amounts in BTB?
    Bacon Taste Booster ingredients list.
    Sugar, Salt, Dextrose, Natural Spice Extractives (Including Celery Seed).

    Here are the directions listed with BTB

    “Specifications:
    Use 5 to 6 oz. of seasoning to 100 lbs. of bellies, plus bacon cure. Add taste booster to brine mixture.”

    To me it seems counterintuitive to add additional salt and sugar and not expect it to not turn out saltier, but maybe I am missing something or maybe the amount used for only 1 or 2 bellies is too insignificant to affect the overall saltiness.

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    processhead Paul, They also state “When you are vacuum tumbling Bacon Taste Booster”.
    That is a dry brine style is it not?

  • Regular Contributors Power User

    Denny O said in Bacon Taste Booster:

    processhead Paul, They also state “When you are vacuum tumbling Bacon Taste Booster”.
    That is a dry brine style is it not?

    I wasn’t sure, but after doing a little research, it appears that vacuum tumbling is a wet brine process. One of the reasons commercial processors like vacuum tumbling is because they can add water weight as well as flavor to their products and do it more quickly. So yes, it appears to be a wet process.

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    Jonathon What do you suggest, I’ll nudge for the last time, please. Or at least head me in the proper direction for information.

    I have 2 whole Berkshire bellies heading into brine and 5 half Durock bellies to do. I’m going to only try the Waltons seasonings on the later, Duroc, by the end of the week!

  • Team Blue Admin Walton's Employee Power User Kansas

    Here it is, Denny O Ignore the chat I sent earlier, finally found it. Though I said I fixed the search, something is still wrong with it, took me WAY too long to find this, even though I searched by booster. Anyway, that is another thing. So, it is 5-6 oz for 100 lb of bellies. From your ingredients (including the water) you have between 9-10 lb of the solution, meaning if you were going to a 10% pump you have enough to “boost” the 100 lb of bellies. I would NOT add the additional water associated with the Bacon Taste Booster you have more than enough with your gallon of water. While I have not used a wet brine without injecting with Bacon Taste Booster in a long time it is still 100% okay to use for that.

    Now since you are doing a home recipe I can’t say exactly if it will be too salty BUT I make nothing bacon flavored anymore without the booster.

    Also, you said you use 2 gallon brine in a 5 gallon bucket but you list 1 gallon of water in your recipe. If you are using 1 gallon of water then the 5-6 oz is correct. The strength of the solution is what matters for a wet brine, not the amount of bacon you are making. If you injected that would change things a bit, but for wet brine, if you make the correct strength solution for 100 lb and just use 10 lb the 10 lb will still taste correct because it is only going to pickup what it normally would. It makes sense in my head, I need Elon’s nueral link thing so I can show people what my brain is imaging without having to rely on my communication skills, or lack thereof.

    Yes vac tumbling is a wet brine process. It is designed to get the meat to pickup more of the meat more quickly by massaging the meat and loosening the fibers. I always thought it also had to do with the vacuum pulling the fibers slightly apart but I guess it has to do a lot more with preventing the solution from becoming a foam during the tumbling process.

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    Jonathon
    As I stated in my in my original post, my 1 gallon mix is doubled. It does not matter how many pounds +/- of meat as long as the meat stays submerged and rotated every day or so, to allow the brine to penetrate. Most always I do not have to inject anything below 3" of thickness.

    This curing mix was used commercially in a butcher shop many years ago doing bacon, hams and other cured meats. C .E. Fassett’s of Adams Center, NY.
    Here is the history if you are interested.
    Pop’s Brine
    You may have to scroll back up to the top of the story.
    This works because the brine/cure will penetrate at a speed of 1/4" per day per exposed area. So a piece of meat that is 2" thick will cure to the center in 4 days. We add 2 extra days to that so I could cure the meat in a total of 6 days. The allowance of the meat in the solution for 2 weeks had no adverse effects. That is why I like this forgiving cure along with there is no water injected into it. Frying bacon creates grease. Water in grease makes a lot of pops and splatters. I usually do not have to use a splatter screen.

    My question is, without weighing the meat, injecting or dry brine, how can “Bacon Taste Booster” be added to my wet curing brine per gallon and achieve the outcome that you were suggesting me to use it for?

    "I do a wet brine in a 5 gallon bucket for pork bellies with a 2 gallon brine mix.

    *My brine mix is: “Per gallon of water”
    3/4 cup Kosher salt
    1 cup dark brown sugar
    1 cup white sugar
    1 rounded tablespoon #1 pink cure
    1 gallon water
    All is dissolved thoroughly before submerging the bellies into the brine.

    I wet brine refrigerated for usually 2 weeks but not less that 10 days."*

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    Jonathon said in Bacon Taste Booster:
    *>If you are using 1 gallon of water then the 5-6 oz is correct. The strength of the solution is what matters for a wet brine, not the amount of bacon you are making. *

    Are you thinking that 5 to 6 oz of Bacon Taste Booster is enough for 1 gallon of water? Because I use a 2 gallon mix then 10 to 12 oz of the booster Plus my kosher salt, brown and white sugar and cure?

  • Team Blue Admin Walton's Employee Power User Kansas

    Denny O Sorry, I did miss where you said it was doubled. Okay so then with 2 gallons you’d ideally want 2 packages, the benefits from 1 package will still absolutely be there but it wont be as strong. The same theory applies as above, the strength of the solution in a wet brine is the key, not necessarily the lb of bacon you are doing.

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    Jonathon Then do you think my sugars, K salt and cure will still be ok or back down the salt?
    Pops brine is anywhere from 2/3 cup to 1 cup/ gallon of water. I have never had a salty taste from a full cup down to a 1/2 cup of K salt in the mix. I’ve never tasted the “Bacon Taste Booster” product from Waltons.

    I always rinse the bellies and sometimes give them a 20 minute soak in freshwater at least once sometimes twice.

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    My original reason for trying Walton’s “Bacon Taste Booster” was in the thinking for Deer Bacon in a very, very coarse ground loaf. And I was going to incorporate it in with “Imitation Bacon #2”.
    So, If I am pleased in a few weeks with the out come, I’m going to be looking at larger quantities of Walton’s “Bacon Taste Booster” at least for my bacon! I don’t get to deal with as many deer. Tee, he, he!

  • Team Blue Admin Walton's Employee Power User Kansas

    Also, I have an admission to make…I was not searching booster…I was searching imitation because I have about the same volume of brain matter as a medium-sized fish.

    Denny O we used to tell people to not add Bacon Taste Booster to anything other than injected and tumbled bacon. The original idea behind it was to be able to add the old world flavor of traditional methods curing methods like vac tumbling. Well, one day I tried it in imitation bacon and have never gone back, every batch of Imitation Bacon Unit Seasoning now gets the booster too. I also add it to snack sticks when I am doing something bacon-flavored.

    I hope you enjoy!

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    Jonathon I asked, “Jonathon Then do you think my sugars, K salt and cure will still be ok or back down the salt?”

  • Team Blue Admin Walton's Employee Power User Kansas

    Darn it, I missed the ENTIRE 1st post. No, I don’t think you should need to back anything down BUT it usually is best to make incremental changes to your process when adding something new, or making smaller batches. That really isn’t easily done with Bacon though. So the purpose of the booster is to impart the old-world flavor when brining so it is going to add more salt taste, but in my opinion, it is not even close to overpowering, plus sugar is the #1 ingredient, not salt in the bacon taste booster.

    If it were me I’d go full strength on everything. The safe thing here is to tell you to add like 75% strength Booster with your regular recipe but that’s for cowards. I am pretty confident that using your full recipe and adding booster will only make you like your bacon better. I have had your bacon, thought it was great and I didn’t find it too salty at all!

  • Regular Contributors Power User

    Jonathon said in Bacon Taste Booster:

    Denny O Sorry, I did miss where you said it was doubled. Okay so then with 2 gallons you’d ideally want 2 packages, the benefits from 1 package will still absolutely be there but it wont be as strong. The same theory applies as above, the strength of the solution in a wet brine is the key, not necessarily the lb of bacon you are doing.

    So are you saying you use a full package of BTB whether making 10 lbs or 100 lbs of bacon?
    That just seems counterintuitive to me, but please explain how that works.

  • Team Blue Admin Walton's Employee Power User Kansas

    processhead This only applies to what he is doing. If you are injecting or vac tumbling then you need to be concerned about concentration. if he put 1 belly in his gallon (I know he is doing 2 but for simplicities sake) then the belly is only going to pick up what the strength of the solution is. So, for injecting it is all about the amount you are putting into the meat, for a brine soak then it is about the strength of the solution.

  • Regular Contributors Power User

    Jonathon Ok, Thank you, sir.

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    Jonathon There is the simplistic answer I was looking for!

  • Team Grey Sous Vide Canning Dry Cured Sausage Masterbuilt PK100

    Denny O So, how much bacon taste booster did you end up using per gallon of brine ??? How did the bacon turn out ???

  • Iowa Regular Contributors Cast Iron Sous Vide Canning Green Mountain Grill Power User

    Mcjagger That will be in my next batch for pork belly bacon. Back then when I was asking I already had one and a half whole belly in brine.
    On my June 23rd comment about deer bacon, that will now be coming up in the next months. I put it on hold last June as I ended up with too many irons in one fire!

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